In the recent case of Mr Shakoor v HMRC, the appellant had failed to disclose the sale of two flats in July 2003 which resulted in significant capital gains. HMRC subsequently raised a discovery assessment for CGT of £49,014 plus a penalty of 70%.

The appellant contended the penalty on the basis that he had taken reasonable care by seeking advice from his accountant. He said the failure to disclose the gain was as a result of negligent advice from his accountant.

The accountant did advise that there was no CGT to pay, and that the disposal of the properties was not reportable on the tax return. However the accountant kept no notes of his advice but said he had relied upon two extra-statutory concessions relating to private residence relief. These clearly did not apply as the appellant had never resided in either property but the taxpayer asked for no explanation of this advice.

The Tribunal found that the taxpayer must have been aware that CGT was due on the properties, and it appeared to be “a case of shutting one’s eyes to what either was or ought reasonably have been seen as incorrect advice”.

The Tribunal did in fact cut the penalty to 30% giving the appellant the “benefit of the doubt” as a result of the poor advice given by his adviser. It observed that the appellant was content to “take a chance on the basis that his accountant had given him comfort, albeit in the rather dubious circumstances”

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