Requirement to Correct – 30 September Deadline Looms

sun

The Weather Today – Scorchio!

 

BUT 30 SEPTEMBER DEADLINE LOOMS

 

WINTER IS COMING!

 

Requirement to Correct

 

Many people over the years of the world becoming smaller and more accessible may have acquired assets abroad.  For example, immigrants and emigrants may have UK interests, but also ones in other countries, whether because of family, work or just acquiring (and perhaps disposing of) a holiday home.

 

Sometimes (it may sound odd) it seems, perhaps when lying on the patio of their newly upgraded Spanish villa, the owner may reach for an escapist novel (such as Banker’s Draft by RG Lennon https://www.amazon.co.uk/Bankers-Draft-R-G-Lennon-ebook/dp/B07CW4JC1J) instead of the latest Taxes Acts.

 

The Taxes Acts would of course warn the reader of the forthcoming deadline of 30 September 2018.  This is to disclose any offshore liabilities (including say Capital Gains on the older villa used to help finance the new one) or the rent when you weren’t using it, or the sale of the home inherited from an uncle, or the apartment in Delhi where your Dad used to live and rental values have gone up so much it would be rude not to etc., etc.,

 

The world is small, families are dispersed; so are assets.  Thanks to automatic sharing of financial information across Governments – permitted in most international double tax treaties,  HMRC will receive bucket loads of data automatically.  Modern computers will allow this to be analysed.  No doubt HMRC will leap to conclusions and try to assess ‘evaded tax’.

 

Key points:

 

  1. Crucially, the time limit for assessment is planned to be extended to 12 years (going back from 4 years) which makes retaining records more important.

 

  1. There is to be a new criminal offence for ‘offshore evasion’, which means HMRC do not need to prove there was ‘deliberate intent’. This heightens the need for professional advice, because innocent ignorance is unlikely to amount to a successful defence.

 

  1. There will be new sanctions for ‘offshore evaders’ based on a penalty of up to 10% of the value of the underlying assets.

 

  1. Tougher sanctions come in for those who fail to disclose relevant offshore interests before 30 September 2018

 

IF IN DOUBT TAKE PROFESSIONAL ADVICE

 

Disguised Remuneration Schemes

 

Anyone involved or may have clients involved in what HMRC may consider to be caught in the new ‘disguised remuneration schemes’ should take independent advice soon, to ensure they can meet the deadline for any appropriate disclosure of 30 September 2018.  It is now less than 2 months away.

 

Settlement terms are available for appropriate disclosure made before the deadline.  After that date, HMRC are threatening more severe action.

Offshore Client Notifications – Are you Affected?

We have written previously on this blog about various HMRC offshore disclosure facilities designed to encourage taxpayers to come forward and declare any unreported foreign income or gains.

HMRC continue to acquire new powers in order to pursue taxpayers and one of the latest requires advisors themselves to write to certain clients on their behalf.

These rules apply to financial institutions like banks but also to so-called “specified relevant persons” (SRPs). Accountants and tax advisors are likely to be an SRP if they provided offshore advice or services over and above simple preparation and delivery of tax returns in the year to 30 September 2016 regarding a client’s personal tax affairs.

If the advisors fall within the rules and are not covered by certain exemptions they will be required to send a standard HMRC headed document to these clients (although writing to all clients is also permitted) with a covering letter that includes certain wording which may not be altered (these are the Offshore Client Notifications).

One of the key things to note is that HMRC’s document directs clients to submit their own online disclosure. You may suspect they are thus attempting to bypass the advisors. We could not possibly comment! If you need to send such letters, we recommend highlighting to the client the dangers of doing so!

The wording SRPs must include in their covering letter is as follows:

“From 2016, HM Revenue & Customs (HMRC) is getting an unprecedented amount of information about people’s overseas accounts, structures, trusts, and investments from more than 100 jurisdictions worldwide, thanks to agreements to increase global tax transparency. This gives HMRC unprecedented levels of information to check that, as in most cases, the right tax has been paid.

If you have already declared all of your past and present income or gains to HMRC, including from overseas, you do not need to worry. But if you are in any doubt, HMRC recommends that you read the factsheet attached to help you decide now what to do next.”

If you are concerned about how these rules might affect your firm, or are an individual with unreported overseas income, please get in contact with us as we would be happy to assist.

The CDF – HMRC’s Contractual Disclosure Facility

The Contractual Disclosure Facility or CDF is the new way in which HMRC tackle suspected tax fraud.

The CDF facility provides an option for the taxpayer to declare all their tax irregularities and settle them along with interest and penalties.  In return HMRC will not bring criminal charges, provided the declarations under the CDF are complete and accurate.

We have seen a number of examples of HMRC applying the new CDF process recently.  It is important to note if the taxpayer does decide to make a detailed declaration that good consideration should be given the content of the “Outline Disclosure” that HMRC request within 60 days of their initial letter.   HMRC do put a lot of emphasis on what was said in the Online Disclosure during the rest of their investigation, in terms of penalties and threatening to bring criminal charges.