Mind the Gap – EMI Share Options from 6 April 2018

Mind-the-GapHMRC have announced via their Employment related securities bulletin (No 27 – April 2018) that due to not having yet received EU State Aid approval for the EMI scheme (the previous approval expired on 6 April 2018) new EMI share options issued after 6 April 2018 will not be treated as tax-approved share option schemes and would therefore be taxed under the far less favourable non-approved regime.

HMRC do reassure taxpayers that options granted up to 5 April 2018 will continue to qualify, so there is no need to panic over existing share options.

However, if you or your clients are in the process of implementing an EMI share scheme, it would be advisable to delay granting options until the approval is granted. Of course, if this is not possible then clients should be made aware of the implications of options falling to be treated as unapproved, or consider other options such as a CSOP.

One of the big differences between approved EMI options and unapproved ones is that any tax paid on exercise is based on the value of shares at grant of the options for EMI schemes, and on the value at exercise for unapproved ones. Therefore any growth in value is sheltered under the EMI scheme.

EMI schemes also provide other valuable features including relaxations of Enterpreneurs’ relief conditions for employees.

Please get in contact with us if you have any concerns or if you require assistance with share option schemes.

Brexit and European Tax Law

Here are some interesting questions. Well, I think them interesting anyway!

1. If we ‘do Brexit’, will we persist with VAT?

2. If so, how will it be administered, bearing in mind the current cross-border arrangements?

3. Will the European Court remain supreme, in terms of judicial opinion and interpretation?

4. On direct taxes, will we revert to double tax treaties, rather than the various European Directives?

5. If so, from what date?

6. If we do leave the EU, will the Courts go back to the ‘literal’ approach to interpreting tax legislation, a la Justice Rowlatt, or will it continue to dabble in the ‘purposive’ approach?

7. In the context of the above how would anyone define ‘The Purpose of Parliament’, in terms of (say) the formulae in the Emloyee Security/Benefit rules?

Je ne sais pas?

Opinions, s’il vous plait.